The Submariner vs. Aquaman

And to continue with my new "Versus" series, I'll give you Aquaman vs. Namor.
Both king of Atlantis. The classic DC vs. Marvel underwater heroes.
Aquaman was created by Paul Norris and Mort Weisinger, the character debuted in More Fun Comics #73 (Nov. 1941). Initially a backup feature in DC's anthology titles, Aquaman later starred in several volumes of a solo title. During the late-1950s and 1960s superhero-revival period known as the Silver Age of Comic Books, he was a founding member of the team the Justice League of America. In the 1990s-present Modern Age of Comic Books, Aquaman's character became more serious than in most previous interpretations, with storylines depicting the weight of his role as king of Atlantis.
Namor the Submariner was created by writer-artist Bill Everett for Funnies, Inc., one of the first "packagers" in the early days of comic books that supplied comics on demand to publishers looking to enter the new medium. Initially created for the unreleased comic Motion Picture Funnies Weekly, the Sub-Mariner first appeared publicly in Marvel Comics #1 (Oct. 1939) — the first comic book from Timely Comics, the 1930s-1940s predecessor of the company Marvel Comics. During that period, known to historians and fans as the Golden Age of Comic Books, the Sub-Mariner was one of Timely's top three characters, along with Captain America and the original Human Torch. Everett said the character's name was inspired by Samuel Coleridge's poem, "The Rime of the Ancient Mariner". The first known comic book antihero, the Sub-Mariner has remained a historically important and relatively popular Marvel character.